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Dingy Skipper

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The dingy skipper is associated with birds-foot trefoil and can be found in quarries, on open rough ground, edges of woodland, even on heathland; it is particularly on chalk and limestone. 


 

My dictionary defines dingy as lacking brightness; drab, dirty, discoloured. Whilst the dingy skipper (Erynnis tages) does not have the beautiful colouring of many of our more familiar butterfly species nonetheless, close up, it does have a unique and subtle colouring. I think the common name is some what unfair!

On the wing in May and June, with a possible second brood here in Dorset in late August, the dingy skipper can be seen where birds-foot trefoil grows and in Dorset that means almost anywhere! It is much more common than many think and can be found in quarries, on open rough ground, edges of woodland, even on heathland; it is particularly associated with chalk and limestone. 

Whilst possibly being a somewhat overlooked species the dingy skipper can also be easily confused with day flying moths like mother Shipton or burnet companion, especially as it often rests, like a moth, with its wings open. Indeed, it is rarely seen with its wings closed above its back like other skipper species.

Well worth looking out for, it is not really dingy at all in my opinion.


 

The records for this species have been organised into reports, charts, maps and photos. Click a pic below to see the detail:

Sites List Distribution Map Some Charts Some Photographs Original Tweets Relatives Guidance Notes